Remembering Cokie Roberts

Cokie Roberts
Cokie Roberts

Pioneering reporter, commentator, and author Cokie Roberts was astute, witty, wise, and kind. When she died last month of breast cancer, a disease that is all too personal for many of us, it was as if we had lost a friend as well as a mentor. What we haven’t lost is her writing, which is deeply knowledgable and engaging. Nor, blessedly, have we lost the clear warm timbre of her voice, so familiar to generations of NPR listeners, because Cokie Roberts read her own audiobooks.

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Author and audiobook fanatic, Aurelia often falls asleep at night with earbuds still attached. She can also be found at www.aureliacscott.com.

5 Delicious Audiobooks Not About Thanksgiving

Let’s Eat Everything!

My American Dream

My American DreamWe became culinary rebels the year that no one wanted turkey for Thanksgiving dinner. My parents preferred it cold anyway, especially in sandwiches made with toasted sourdough, Hellman’s Mayonnaise, and lettuce. My brother preferred pumpkin pie. And that year, I preferred tofu. So on the day, we made hamburgers and tofu burgers on toasted English muffins, Caesar salad, and pumpkin pie. We giggled all the way through the meal, feeling as if we’d gotten away with something wonderful. In that subversive, liberating spirit, I offer five delicious tales of food and living, because next Thursday you’ll want to have options. Read more…

Author and audiobook fanatic, Aurelia often falls asleep at night with earbuds still attached. She can also be found at www.aureliacscott.com.

Aurelia’s Audio Adventures: My Grandfather’s War

Revisiting WWI through Fiction and Nonfiction Audiobooks

The World RemadeAt age twenty-two, my grandfather looked a hero in his WWI pilot’s uniform. Peaked cap at a rakish angle, hand on his father’s shoulder, arm around his mother, he smiled broadly for the Brownie camera. Only the bulge of a service revolver beneath his jacket hinted at upcoming danger.

In this 100th anniversary year of America’s entry into the war, I wish I’d been able to hear about his experiences. He died when I was young, though, so I was never able to ask how the French battlefields looked from his biplane’s cockpit, how the rat-a-tat-tat of aerial combat really sounded, and frivolously, why didn’t he wear a silk scarf in the photo? Or did that sartorial flourish belong only to Snoopy’s Red Baron?

The Guns of August

Instead, I’ve found a vicarious experience of my grandfather’s war in books and film, beginning with Barbara Tuchman’s Pulitzer Prize-winning history of the war’s start, THE GUNS OF AUGUST. I read it as a teenager, and recently listened to the Earphones Award-winning performance by one of my favorite narrators, Nadia May (also known as Wanda McCaddon). That’s two prizes for one compulsively readable account of the dares and double-dares that caused so much bravery and death. Read more…

Author and audiobook fanatic, Aurelia often falls asleep at night with earbuds still attached. She can also be found at www.aureliacscott.com.