Home

The Duchess Deal

Tease: Audies romance finalists

THIS IS IT! (I’m humming Kenny Loggins — no judgment, please.) It’s the time of the year we get to recognize a superlative group of Audies finalists. This week, we’re presenting the Audies Romance nominees to you (we’ll be doing Erotica titles next). In case you have a to-listen pile of epic proportions, I’ve tried to give a quick sketch for each title so that you can plan your listening adventures accordingly. Enjoy, and congratulations to every nominee.

Audie Award Romance Finalists

The Duchess Deal
The Ladies' Room
Come Sundown
Cake: A Love Story
Any Day Now

Read more…

Hardcore Twenty-Four

Behind the Mic: Hardcore Twenty-Four

Lorelei King knows what Janet Evanovich’s listeners love about the Stephanie Plum audiobooks, and you can tell when you listen. Lorelei’s fabulous skill brings alive all of the lovable and despicable characters and will make you laugh out loud — and so will her Behind the Mic video for HARDCORE TWENTY-FOUR.

“It has all the things you’ve come to expect from Janet—the quirky humor, the zany characters, and it has a boa constrictor, it has zombies . . . what more could you want?”—Narrator Lorelei King

Read more…

It Occurs to Me that I Am America

Robin’s Roundup: February 9 New Audiobook Reviews

This week I noticed an impressive crop of nonfiction audiobooks reviewed. Thoughtful and powerful audiobooks on immigration, politics, abuse, and race give us the chance to listen to important and varied perspectives. We often see some of these complex topics handled in both nonfiction and fiction. Listeners usually have a specific preference—a factual account, or the same topic with imagined historical or emotional detail.  Here are some thoughts on audiobook pairs from our recent reviews.

It Occurs to Me that I Am America
Revolution Song

Russell Shorto’s new history REVOLUTION SONG takes a look at the American Revolution through the stories of six people. I’ll pair that with IT OCCURS TO ME THAT I AM AMERICA, a collection of short stories by Richard Russo, Joyce Carol Oates, Neil Gaiman, Lee Child, Mary Higgins Clark, and thirty other contemporary authors. Read more…

Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry

Aurelia’s Audio Adventures: So Love Goes

Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold FryWhen I was about seventeen, I read the obituary of a New York City matron that included her recipe for a happy marriage. She had recommended living as she and her husband did, in side-by-side brownstones with a connecting door that they never used before 10 AM. At the time, I thought that immensely clever. Now that I’ve been married forever, I wonder why have such a well-managed relationship, when instead you could walk the length of England in uncomfortable shoes to reach your beloved, as does the protagonist in Rachel Joyce’s THE UNLIKELY PILGRIMAGE OF HAROLD FRY? Or when, as in Joyce’s companion novel, THE LOVE SONG OF MISS QUEENIE HENNESSEY, you could commit your heart as fiercely and nobly as the woman to whom Harold is limping? Jim Broadbent won an Earphones Award for Harold’s story and Celia Imre won the same for Queenie’s. I have read and listened to each more than once and can only say that the exquisite, quirky novels are so well narrated that it hurts, and that they present the truth of love in all its heartbreaking glory. Read more…

Last Car to Elysian Fields

Solve: Dave Robicheaux

One of the very first series I ever listened to on audiobook was James Lee Burke’s Dave Robicheaux series. And this is an interesting series because for many of the first thirteen audios, there are two different versions: one narrated by the late Mark Hammer and one narrated by Will Patton. Not only are they two different narrations, but also two significantly different interpretations of Burke’s long-running, signature character.

Last Car to Elysian FieldsHaving read several of the books in print before starting to listen to them, I found Mark Hammer’s depiction of Dave Robicheaux  to be much more in line with my own mental images, and I listened devoutly to his lyrical productions that verbally duked out the internal conflicts of the haunted detective, glided effortlessly between the plethora of accents and dialects peppered generously throughout the prose, and enveloped me in the atmosphere Burke’s become so famous for. Even his slower pacing aligned with the easy, southern, Louisiana bayou tempo of my imagination. Read more…