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Singapore Sentosa monorail and merlion

Singapore on My Mind

Singapore Sentosa monorail and merlion
Singapore Sentosa monorail and merlion

For the last couple of weeks, all eyes in the U.S. have been focused on Singapore, where Trump and Kim held their meetings on Sentosa (with its colorful monorail and Merlion statue). Having recently visited Singapore and stayed on Sentosa right next door to the hotel where the meetings were held, I can relate to the descriptions and pictures that fill the news screens. Singapore is hot and humid; it is a clean, rules-based, well organized country. While English is the national language, the country is truly multi-lingual. Everyone speaks their mother tongue, which might be Chinese, Malay or Tamil, Indonesian, Japanese, Filipino, or Thai, and then maybe some version of English. Read more…

Pride

Honoring Pride’s Continuing Relevance

PrideThe history of Pride marches and events stretches back now nearly half a century. Books and audiobooks for young listeners continue to grow in both number and depth of treatment, where LGBTQI characters have moved from props to tropes to engaging people who happen to identify along the diverse orientation spectrum. It’s a little—well, a lot—harder to find such an audiobook presence for adult listeners seeking books, authors, and narrators with whom to celebrate Pride.

However, they do exist, and there are a number that adult listeners may want to hear this month especially. Read more…

Edoardo Ballerini

Explore Ancient & Contemporary Egypt in The Last Watchman of Old Cairo

Edoardo Ballerini brings listeners Behind the Mic to share his thoughts about narrating THE LAST WATCHMAN OF OLD CAIRO, an audiobook where his narration is as magical as the story itself.

“The book is only 300 pages, and yet it covers generations and time and places and themes and so much more.”—Narrator Edoardo Ballerini

Read more…

7 Top New British Mystery Audiobooks

7 Top New British Mysteries

Summer is the perfect time to relax with a great audiobook—and for me, I go first to British mysteries. I try to keep up with authors I don’t know well—like Ruth Ware or Anthony Horowitz—and also follow favorite long-running series—like Charles Todd’s Ian Rutledge or Martha Grimes’s Inspector Jury and his motley crew of village regulars. Peter May, author of several compelling stories set on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, is another favorite. Since I binged on the TV series “Vera,” I have happily been consuming Ann Cleeves’s Vera Stanhope audiobooks. Read more…

Run Like a Duck

Aurelia listening on the PromNow that it’s all but officially summer,  joggers are loping along our city streets. My own running skills are best described by telling you that in 7th grade, I was panting on the far side of the field when our coach Mrs. Potter shouted, “Aurelia, stop running like a duck. You look ridiculous.” Now I walk instead of gasping for breath, and I enjoy other people’s athleticism in audiobooks about running, such as the Tarahumara profiled in Christopher McDougall’s BORN TO RUN: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen. His quest to understand running took him to people who can trot effortlessly for hours in Mexico’s Copper Canyon mountains. Listening to Fred Sanders’s warm rendition of this perennial bestseller, I reveled in McDougall’s wild adventure, started eating chia seeds, and even started to embrace my duck steps and jog occasionally mid-walk. Read more…